Biblical Memoirs

October 31: Reformation Day. On October 31, 1517, An Augustinian monk posted ninety-five statements for discussion on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany. Dr. Martin Luther hoped that posting his theses would bring about an academic debate regarding repentance, the sale of indulgences, and other matters of concern within the Roman Catholic Church. However, Rome eventually excommunicated Luther, judging him to be a heretic. Luther’s reforms, centered on the teaching that a believer is justified by grace through faith in Jeus Christ, sparked religious reforms not only in the German states, but also in many European countries. In 1667, Elector John George II of Saxony standardized the custom of observing Luther’s October 31 posting of the Ninety-five Theses.

Extra: 

REFORMATION

Antiphon

I will also speak of Your testimonies before kings

and shall not be put to shame.

(Psalm 119:46)

Responsory

 L:    I finf my delight in Your commandments,

which I love.                            (Psalm 119:47)

Now the righteousness of God has been

manifested apart from the law, the

righteousness of God through faith in

Jesus Christ for all who believe.

(Romans 3:21-22)

        Glory be to the Father and to the Son and

to the Holy Spirit.

C:     I will also speak of Your testimonies before kings

and shall not be put to shame.

(Psalm 119:46)

 

For November 1All Saint’s Day. This feast is the most comprehensive of the days of commemoration, encompassing the entire scope of that great cloud of witnesses with which we are surrounded (Hebrews 12:1). It holds before the eyes of faith that great multitude which no man can number: all the saints of God in Christ–from every nation, race, culture, and language–who have come “out of the great tribulation…who have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb” (Revelation 7:9, 14). As such, it sets before us the full height and depth and breadth and length of our dear Lord’s gracious salvation (Ephesians 3:17-19). It shares with Easter a celebration of the resurrection, since all those who have died with Christ Jesus have also been raised with him (Romans 6:3-8). It shares with Pentecost a celebration of the ingathering of the entire Church catholic–in heaven and on earth, in all times and places–in the one Body of Christ, in the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. Just as we have all been called to the one hope that belongs to our call, “one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all,” (Ephesians 4:4-6). And the Feast of All Saints shares with the final Sundays of the Church Year an eschatological focus on the life everlasting and a confession that “the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us” (Romans 8:18). In all of these emphases, the purpose of this feast is to fix our eyes upon Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, that we might not grow weary or fainthearted (Hebrews 12:2-3).

Bonus:

ALL SAINTS DAY

AND THE COMMON

FOR ALL SAINTS

Antiphon

These are the ones out of

the great tribulations.

They have washed their robes and made

them white in the blood of the Lamb.

(Revelation 7:14)

Responsory

L:  Then the kingdom of heaven will be like

ten virgins who took their lamps and went

to meet the bridegroom.      (Matthew 25:1)

     Trim your lamps, O you wise virgins!

(Based on Matthew 25:1)

     Glory be to the Father and to the Son and

to the Holy Spirit.

C:  At midnight there was a cry, “Here comes the

bridegroom! Come out to meet him.”

(Matthew 25:6)